• Tsutomu Kumagai, President of Tokyo Energy & Systems Inc. (TES)

    Ready to power up the ASEAN With 70 years of experience in the Japanese domestic market, Tokyo Energy & Systems Inc. (TES) specializes in the design and construction of thermal, nuclear, and hydroelectric power plants. President of TES, Tsutomu Kumagai, discusses investing in the ASEAN power grid, Japan’s competitive advantages ...
  • Eiitsu Masaki, President and CEO of ALCONIX

    Creating an ‘extensive high-potential corporate group of Japan’s best assets’ Since its establishment, Japanese firm ALCONIX has continuously been evolving by adapting and providing high-quality Light Metals and Copper Products, Electronic and Functional Materials, Non-Ferrous Raw Materials, and Construction and Industrial Materials, among others. Eiitsu Masaki, President and CEO of ...
  • Nobuyoshi Fujisawa, President & CEO president of J Trust

    J Trust finds a banking market niche in ASEAN Nobuyoshi Fujisawa, President & CEO president of J Trust, says that while other big banks focus on mega projects, J Trust has focused on a business approach that not only generates profits, but is improving lives and ‘making people happy’ through ...
  • Masahiko Miyata, President and CEO, Asahi Intecc

    Masahiko Miyata, President and CEO, Asahi Intecc
    Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister of Japan since December 2012, has proposed the three “arrows” of what has become known as Abenomics in order to reform and recover the Japanese economy: monetary stimulus, fiscal flexibility, and structural reform. The first arrow would mobilize Japan’s production powers and the third would expand ...
  • Yoshihiko Hatanaka, President and CEO, Astellas

    Yoshihiko Hatanaka, President and CEO, Astellas
    International media, such as the Financial Times or the Economist have questioned the implementation of the third arrow of Abenomics, however we have seen several reforms take place in the defense, agriculture and tourism sectors. In your sector, we have seen the introduction of the Japan revitalization plan closely linked ...
  • Osamu Masuda, President, Astomos Energy

    Osamu Masuda, President, Astomos Energy
    The Great East Japan Earthquake has brought sweeping social and economic change in Japan and given rise to a number of issues. In particular, the resulting nuclear accident and power supply shortages have once again called into question the nature of Japan’s energy supply, and discussion of energy that returns ...
  • Ichiro Matsubara, President and CEO, Atom Medical

    Ichiro Matsubara, President and CEO, Atom Medical
    To reflate Japan and reform it, Shinzo Abe, prime minister since December 2012, proposed the three “arrows” of what has become known as Abenomics: monetary stimulus, fiscal “flexibility” and structural reform. The first arrow would mobilize Japan’s productive powers and the third would expand them, allowing the second arrow to ...
  • Kazuo Nakamura, President and CEO, CMIC

    Kazuo Nakamura, President and CEO, CMIC
    B&I: International media, such as the Financial Times or the Economist have questioned the implementation of the third arrow of Abenomics, however we have seen several reforms take place in the defence, agriculture and tourism sector. In your sector, we have seen the introduction of the Japan revitalisation plan closely ...
  • Shin Ashida, Chairman, President and CEO, JCR Pharmaceuticals

    Shin Ashida, Chairman, President and CEO, JCR Pharmaceuticals
    International media, such as the Financial Times or the Economist have questioned the implementation of the third arrow of Abenomics, however we have seen several reforms take place in the defense, agriculture and tourism sector. In your sector, we have seen the introduction of the Japan revitalization plan closely linked ...
  • Tsuyoshi Matsushita, President, MTG

    Tsuyoshi Matsushita, President, MTG
    To reflate Japan and reform it, Shinzo Abe, prime minister since December 2012, proposed the three “arrows” of what has become known as Abenomics: monetary stimulus, fiscal “flexibility” and structural reform. The first arrow would mobilize Japan’s productive powers and the third would expand them, allowing the second arrow to ...